Marine Conservation Biology Institute Marine Conservation Biology Institute
   
Marine Conservation Biology Institute
Protecting Marine Ecosystems

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification

A radar station
Change in sea surface pH caused by anthropogenic CO2 between the 1700s and the 1990s.

The threat that climate change poses to marine biodiversity and ecosystems is unmatched in our oceans.  Already, the modern ocean’s chemistry, temperature and oceanographic patterns are changing due the increased carbon content of the atmosphere. How oceans and their biological communities react to global climate change remains to be one of the most important and unanswered questions in our modern world.

In order to effectively address the threat of oceanographic climate change we must use strategies of carbon reduction and sequestration, marine conservation through reserve networks and responsive management, and further research. MCBI is working hard to protect threatened species and biodiverse ecosystems that are uniquely vulnerable to rapid marine climate change.  We partner with scientists, management agencies and other conservation organizations to advocate for the protection and management of marine ecosystems that are imperiled by climate change in the 21st century. In this effort, we hope to protect valuable natural resources and tune a broader audiences’ ear to the importance of human-generated global climate and oceanographic change.

As a marine conservation organization, MCBI understands that climate change uniquely affects differing geographic regions and biological communities. To effectively advocate for the conservation of climate-threatened species and ecosystems, our understanding of the interface between global climate and health of marine systems needs to be advanced.

 

Climate Change and the Carbon Cycle
Why does CO­2 matter?

Marine Conservation in a Changing Climate
How do we manage and protect marine systems in a changing world?

Sea Surface Warming
Primary threats: Coral bleaching, Exceeding thermal tolerance limits, Biogeographic range shifting

Sea Level Rise
Primary threats: Loss of critical habitat for marine mammals, turtles and seabirds, Changing light and depth levels for seafloor communities

Ocean Acidification
Primary threats: Changing ocean chemistry in deep and shallow ecosystems, Biological changes from polar to tropical ecosystems, Reductions in the calcification of shells, coral reefs, and plankton

Offshore Renewable Energy
Finding ways to produce sustainable power with minimal harm to ocean ecosystems

 

Our Work on Climate Change and Ocean Acidification:

afterOcean Acidification- From Ecological Impacts to Political Opportunitites - MCBI publishes an entire issue of Current on Ocean Acidification.

 

afterLetter to the EPA on Ocean Acidification - MCBI and 31 other organizations wrote a letter to the EPA asking them to address ocean acidification through the Clean Water Act.

 

OA mapOcean Acidification - What a more acidic ocean means to marine life.

coralDeep-Sea Corals - Protecting deep-sea corals from ocean acidification.

s2ssOcean Acidification and Its Potential Effects on Marine Ecosystems - A journal article in Ecology and Conservation Biology.

after2008 AAAS Symposium - Ocean Iron Fertilization and Carbon Sequestration:
Can the Oceans Save the Planet?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learn More:

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification

Climate Change and the Carbon Cycle

Marine Conservation in a Changing Climate

Sea Surface Warming

Sea Level Rise

Ocean Acidification

Offshore Renewable Energy

 

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification Projects:

Ocean Acidification- From Ecological Impacts to Political Opportunitites

EPA and Ocean Acidification

Ocean Acidification

2008 AAAS Symposium

Deep-Sea Corals

Ocean Acidification and Its Potential Effects on Marine Ecosystems